Alaska Can Do Better


Ten years ago today (5/13/05) Alaska Airlines illegally locked out nearly 500 men and women, many of them with decades of service at the airline. At 3 AM Alaska Airlines bused in subcontractor replacements — people paid much lower wages with fewer, if any, benefits, working for Menzies Aviation.

Check out the video: Alaska Airlines: Impacts of 10 yrs of outsourcing jobs at SeaTac

  • Turnover among baggage handlers for Alaska Airlines is high; the resulting lack of experience and tarmac training causes safety concerns.
  • Since 2005, Alaska Airlines has made more than $2 billion in net profits.
  • The move cost King County’s economy at least $115 million, according to a new analysis.
  • In response, the voters of Seatac approved a 2013 initiative to raise the wages 4,700 airport workers to $15/hr, causing their own ripple effect.
  • Alaska Airlines sued to block Seatac Prop 1, and it now awaits a WA State Supreme Court decision.
  • Alaska’s action 10 years ago was mirrored again and again by other airlines. Today many U.S. airport jobs are outsourced to low wage subcontractors.
  • This is part of a national trend – economists say more than 1 in 3 baggage handlers and airplane cleaners live in or near poverty. Wages have dropped by nearly 45% of many of these jobs over the last decade.

January 2015 Newsletter

We’ve Been Robbed

Over a 100 people gathered outside of Alaska Airlines headquarters late November to call on the airline to stop robbing us of our $15.

News crews pushed their way through the crowd interviewing us and taking video and photos as the SeaTac police looked on.

The fight for $15 at Sea-Tac Airport has gotten widespread attention. Journalists from around the globe have been watching and we have been speaking out about it to anyone who will listen. Continue reading

It’s Our Airport September 2014



We, the workers, are the union.

Unions are made up of workers standing together for better working conditions, pay, and respect in the workplace. Unions are how we show our power we have as workers when we come together.

We are stronger together.

When we stand together we can actually address some of the larger problems we all face in the workplace here at the airport. With all of us working together we have more power.

What do unions do?

One way we show our collective power is by bargaining a contract as a union.

Another way unions build collective power is by fighting for minimum wage laws, overtime, and other workplace protections.

Both ways are important. What really matters though is that when we are alone, management gets to decide what to do with us, but together we can push back against the problems we have at the workplace.

They can ignore one person, but they can’t ignore all of us speaking with one voice. Continue reading