Eaves-dropping on Alaska Airlines CEO, Brad Tilden

Did you ever wonder what goes on when the CEO of a big corporate airlines like Alaska Airlines reports directly to international investment companies about how the company is doing?

The way these calls usually work is a very official-sounding moderator ceremoniously first announces the CEO. After he paints a rosy picture of quarterly and, in this case, year-end earnings, the moderator solemnly announces each investor in turn for questions. This is when the formal tone breaks down. The investors and executive staff fall into a relaxed easy-going Q&A – often calling each other by first names. It sounds like old friends knocking back a few beers and slapping each other on the back congratulating each other for a job well done. Continue reading

Airport workers are fed up.

By Nathan Jackson

Airport workers have been fighting for better work treatment for months now; workers and community members are still taking action to make every airport job a good job.

Workers for Menzies, a low wage contractor hired by Alaska Airlines handles bags for passengers. Workers, for months now have been asking for better wages, fair treatment and a voice in their workplace. The company has ignored them. The workers and community members have had enough and we marched on the Menzies HR office and demanded to be heard.

A security guard tried to force us to leave, but we held our ground. We’ve been ignored for long enough and they would listen to us this time. We were many and we were all in this together. Some of the workers were from different companies and different jobs. They know that when the workers get together in solidarity that is when real change can happen.

The manager on duty finally came out of the office and immediately launched into a “blah blah blah this is a private business, blah blah get outta here” type of speech, but he was interrupted by a Menzies worker.

“I work for Menzies,” said Ulysses. “I have every right to be here and you guys just haven’t listened to us when we go through our managers. So we’re here right now, together.”

The manager stopped using talking points and started to listen.
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On May 15th, tell Alaska Airlines: Let’s make every airport job a good job.

Rally at Alaska Airlines Shareholder Meeting

May 15, 2012, 2:30 p.m.

Museum of Flight | 9404 East Marginal Way S, Seattle

Alaska Airlines profits are up and top executives are firmly among the top 1%. But Alaska is not sharing their success with the nearly 4000 Sea-Tac poverty-wage workers who make the company’s success possible.

Join workers, community members and faith leaders to tell Alaska Airlines’ Board of Directors to Make All Airport Jobs Good Jobs.